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Podcast "45 minutes future"

45 minutes of the future. This is the Thünen Institute's podcast on the transformation of land and sea use. Together with our guests from science and practice, we look for ways to master current social challenges - in three quarters of an hour. We ask, for example, how the various interests on land and at sea can be reconciled in terms of sustainable use, how our forests can cope with climate change, why it is so difficult to ensure food prices are fair or to improve animal welfare. And we provide answers that are science-based and solution-oriented.

Our hosts

Lydia Heller studied political science and communications and, as a freelance radio author, produces mainly radio features for Deutschlandfunk and Deutschlandfunk Kultur - preferably on scientific topics.

 

 

Marko Pauli is a freelance radio author for Deutschlandfunk Kultur, BR and SWR. He primarily produces radio features dealing with environmental protection and species conservation. He also works as a presenter for ByteFM.

Episode 8: One label fits all?

More and more people in Germany and the EU are paying attention to sustainability when shopping. Various labels promise orientation. But they usually only provide information on individual aspects such as working conditions or the origin of a product. The idea is that a state label should cover all aspects of a sustainably produced product. Can this work?

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Episode 8: One label fits all?

Episode 7: All oganic, everything fine?

The German government has set a target of 30 per cent organic farming by 2030, but the outbreak of the war in Ukraine has once again prompted critics to claim that organic farming cannot guarantee food security. Organic farming is the only way to ensure food security in the future, the proponents counter. We ask: Is organic farming suitable for the masses?

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Episode 7: All oganic, everything fine?

Episode 6: Small is beautiful?

Agriculture, the timber industry, fishing, local supply - everywhere the extinction of small businesses is lamented. Trust in these enterprises is high. Yet, from a scientific point of view, there is no evidence that small farms are fundamentally better or more sustainable than large farms, neither from an environmental nor from an animal welfare point of view. Where does this emotional affection for small farms come from, when even organically managed farms are sometimes very large? Do large structures also have advantages?

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Episode 6: Small is beautiful?

Episode 5: For the museum only?

Climate change, fishing closures, Brexit, red tape, competition for space, an outdated fleet and the image as destroyer of the environment pose an existential challenge to the fishing industry. On the other hand, coastal fishing is positively connotated as a sustainable, artisanal activity. Which path should be taken in order to give coastal fishing a future?

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Episode 5: For the museum only?

Episode 4: Fair, true, cost-covering?

The prices producers receive for food should be fair and secure their livelihoods. This applies to both the German dairy farmer and the Latin American coffee picker. But what does that actually mean? And how can social and ecological demands be incorporated into pricing? What possibilities does the state have to influence pricing?

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Episode 4: Fair, true, cost-covering?

Episode 3: To each animal its own pleasure?

German livestock farming is under pressure: international competition here, demands for higher animal welfare and environmental standards there. Every form of animal husbandry is associated with environmental impacts. Are there options for making animal welfare, environmental and climate protection an integral part of agriculture?

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Episode 3: To each animal its own pleasure?

Episode 2: Is there still a place available?

In the North and Baltic Seas, every square metre is being fought over: Traditional users such as fisheries are increasingly competing with wind farm operators, ship owners, raw material producers, the military, environmental protection and nature conservation for the scarce marine space. With the argument of the necessary energy transition, offshore energy producers are currently asserting themselves against many other interests. What could a peaceful co-existence of all interest groups look like?

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Episode 2: Is there still a place available?

Episode 1: My field - my power station?

80 percent - this is the share that renewable energies should have in electricity consumption by 2030. The Ukraine war has made the issue of energy transition even more urgent. Agricultural land is increasingly being considered as a location for energy production. Open space and agri-photovoltaics offer interesting options - also from the farmers' point of view.

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Episode 1: My field - my power station?

Contact

Nadine Kraft
Phone
+49 531 596 1026
nadine.kraft@thuenen.de
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