Skip to main content
[Translate to English:]
[Translate to English:]
Institute of

OF Organic Farming

Work group Cattle

More than a half of the organically managed land is grassland, and only herbivores like cattle, sheep or goats are able to transform the growth into food. In addition, the market of organically produced milk and milk products increases continuously for years. Thus, dairy farming is the most important branch of organic animal husbandry.

Consumers associate organic dairy farming primarily with a welfare oriented animal husbandry and a limited use of veterinary drugs. Therefore, we focus on animal health management, animal welfare and product quality of a sustainable organic dairy farming.

Projects

MinimA

Maintaining the therapeutic efficiency of antibiotics in human and veterinary medicine requires their strictly demand-oriented use. In our project, we apply this principle to the dry off treatment of dairy cows on farms.

More
MinimA

MIX-ENABLE - Grazing together: cattle and broilers

Specialisation increases also in organic farming. Even if there are more than one species on a farm they usually will be managed separately. Partners from seven EU-countries investigate the potential of a higher integration between farm components

More
MIX-ENABLE - Grazing together: cattle and broilers

Pasture based fattening of male dairy calves – an option for the future?

Today, immediate separation of cow and calf after parturition is common in dairy farming. However, an alternative is the dam Pasture based fattening of male dairy calves – an option for the future?

More
Pasture based fattening of male dairy calves – an option for the future?

Maize and beans in mixed cropping

In the future, the amount of on-farm or locally produced feedstuff should increase to ensure a sustainable protein supply for farm animals. In our project we analyze the potential of the mixed cropping of maize with runner or scarlet runner beans.

More
Maize and beans in mixed cropping

Bros on pasture

Wir untersuchen die Gemischt-Beweidung durch Bruderhähne und -kälber auf einer Weidefläche, die durch streifenförmige Pappel-KUPs unterteilt ist. Ziel ist die Bewertung dieser Haltungsform nach ökonomischen und Tierwohlaspekten.

More
Bros on pasture

CowData - for a better understanding

Today, behaviour and performance of farm animals are recorded in manifold ways, often directly at the animal. The concatenation and intelligent interpretation of this data can support the farm management.

More
CowData - for a better understanding

More than a niche? The potential of dam rearing for marketing of milk and male calves

Some consumers ask for milk that is produced without separating cow and calf shortly after birth. We ask if dairy farmers will get more chances to market their products by dam rearing their calves.

More
More than a niche? The potential of dam rearing for marketing of milk and male calves

More time with the mother - better for the calf?

Today, immediate separation of cow and calf after parturition is common in dairy farming. However, an alternative is the dam rearing system: Dam or foster cows suckle the calves and are additionally milked. We are investigating possible long-term effects on dairy heifers reared in that system.

More
More time with the mother - better for the calf?

Cow-calf contact in dairy farming - how does it work?

A standard procedure how to rear dairy calves by cows does not exist. Every farm has to find its own system. In future, we will support this process with a guideline.

More
Cow-calf contact in dairy farming - how does it work?

Less antibiotics - higher mastitis risk?

Every use of antibiotics bears the risk for development of antibiotic resistances and to promote resistant bacteria. Thus, the use of such substances has to be questioned. In dairy farming antibiotic dry cow treatment is an important tool to reduce mastitis on herd level. Usually, if an indication exists, all quarters of an udder will be treated with antibiotics disregarding the infection status of the individual quarter. Therefore the question arises, whether it would be possible to minimize the use of antibiotics by quarterspecific treatment without increasing the infection risk of the ...

More
Less antibiotics - higher mastitis risk?

Sensors show how dairy cows graze

Accelerometers can be used to identifiy activity. Depending on the part of the body where the sensors are attached, walking or lying as well as head movements can be recorded.

More
Sensors show how dairy cows graze

Cows on organic farms - looked at through interdisciplinary glasses

Studies have shown:Cows in organic dairy farms are not healthier and face mastiis as well as metabolic disorders. This joint research project aimed for an interdisciplinary approach to that phenomenon.

More
Cows on organic farms - looked at through interdisciplinary glasses

Natural bedding material - a risk factor for organic dairy cows?

n organic farms, a natural bedding material has to be provided in the lying areas of cows. However, bacteria and other mastitis pathogens may grow very well under these conditions. Thus, the risk for the cows to get infected by these pathogens increases as well. The project investigated how organic dairy farmers handle their bedding material, and whether an increased risk for the organic dairy cows really exists.

More
Natural bedding material -  a risk factor for organic dairy cows?

Societal expectations towards ecological dairy cattle husbandry

While husbandry of pigs and poultry is discussed frequently dairy cattle husbandry seems to be of less importance. But does this really mean that the society is not interested in it? Or does it mean that they agree to it or do they even have no perception about it?

More
Societal expectations towards ecological dairy cattle husbandry

Scroll to top