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Institute of

FG Forest Genetics

Project

Indigenous shrubs



Checking the possibilities to identify the origin of shrubs by chloroplast DNA

Indigenous trees and shrubs have adapted to the regional environmental conditions during many generations. Thereby they developed local or regional well-adapted populations. These typical local populations could be changed or displaced by planting large numbers of shrubs of an indigenous botanical species, but a far distant geographic origin.

Background and Objective

Indigenous trees and shrubs have adapted to the regional environmental conditions during many generations. Thereby they developed local or regional well-adapted populations. These typical local populations could be changed or displaced by planting large numbers of shrubs of an indigenous botanical species, but a far distant geographic origin. It is recommended to use trees and shrubs of a regional origin for planting in the landscape.

Approach

Chloroplast DNA markers will be developed to characterise between-population differentiation for a selected shrub species. It will be checked whether these markers could reflect regional differentiation.

Results

In this study, a total of 86 populations and 673 individuals were sampled all over Europe. Eight different haplotypes were recognised by combinations of several PCR-RFLP patterns. They are divided into 3 groups of related types. There is no association between these 3 groups and their geographic occurrence within the tested material. One haplotype strongly dominates in the whole distribution area. It takes nearly 90 percent whereas the remaining seven haplotypes together reach to approximately 10 percent. Besides the low number of haplotypes, the total genetic variation HT = 0.15 is much lower in Cornus sanguinea compared to other European tree and shrub species.

Involved external Thünen-Partners

  • Hochschule für nachhaltige Entwicklung Eberswalde (HNEE)
    (Eberswalde, Deutschland)

Funding Body

  • Federal Office for Agriculture and Food (BLE)
    (national, öffentlich)

Duration

11.2004 - 3.2007

More Information

Project status: finished

Publications

  1. 0

    Lemke A, Liesebach H (2014) Zertifizierungssysteme und Herkunftskontrolle : Gebietseigene Gehölze. Dt Baumschule 66(2):34-37

  2. 1

    Liesebach H (2012) Genetische Kontrollmethoden zur Herkunftssicherung bei Gehölzen. In: Bouillon J (ed) 30. Osnabrücker Baumpflegetage. Berlin; Hannover: Patzer, pp 51-63

  3. 2

    Liesebach H (2012) Landschaftsgehölze - Zertifizierungssysteme und Möglichkeiten zur Herkunftskontrolle mit genetischen Markern. Pro Baum(4):10-15

  4. 3

    Götz B, Liesebach H (2009) Genetische Variation im Verbreitungsgebiet des Roten Hartriegels, Cornus sanguinea L.. Mitt Dt Dendrol Gesellsch 94:61-72

    https://literatur.thuenen.de/digbib_extern/dk042770.pdf

  5. 4

    Liesebach H, Götz B (2008) Chloroplast DNA diversity in red dogwood (Cornus sanguinea L.) in Europe. In: Abstracts / Workshop Genetic conservation and management of sparsely distributed trees and bushes - in the interface between conservation and utilization : 15.-17. September 2008, Kongskilde Friluftsgård, Sor¢, Denmark. Copenhagen: Univ, p 3

  6. 5

    Liesebach H, Götz B (2008) Low chloroplast DNA diversity in red dogwood (Cornus sanguinea L.). Silvae Genetica 57(4-5):291-300

    https://literatur.thuenen.de/digbib_extern/dk041051.pdf

  7. 6

    Liesebach H, Schneck V, Kätzel R (2007) Phänotypische und genetische Variation bei Landschaftsgehölzen : ein Review und Beitrag zur aktuellen Diskussion über Herkunftsgebiete. Naturschutz Landschaftsplanung 32(10):297-303

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